2019

Part 1 – 2019

The first few months of the year were quite busy ones for the BanglaCymru medical team. On a monthly basis I receive official reports from our medical co-ordinator, Dr Jishu about the activities of our medical centre, the mobile surgery in the poor communities and also our prime mission which is to treat cleft and burns patients. In addition, I have regular financial reports on matters such as our centre’s employees’ salaries, the costs of operations and the running of our medical centre. 

One of the most poignant events recently was when our mobile surgery went to a community not far from our centre where there had been a very serious fire. Fire incidents are very common in these poor areas for many reasons; people depend on fires to cook, on a flame for light and to repel mosquitos. Another problem is that there is no water supply in most of the huts where large families live, therefore extinguishing a fire speedily is not always possible. In this fire eleven children and adults were killed and the BanglaCymru team were there to provide medical treatment for some of the survivors.

A young child with a cleft lip and pallet before and after treatment. The surgery out in the community

A few weeks ago, Dr Jishu and his team went to the city of Tangail in the Dhaka division, 100 km north of the city which is in the centre of the country. The population of Tangail is over three-quarters of a million which is three times the population of Cardiff with thousands of its residences living in acute poverty. BanglaCymru medical team has worked in this city in the past. This time they operated on 44 patients, the majority of whom were young children and some of them with an extremely serious cleft condition such as the child shown above. This brings the number of lives changed since the founding of BanglaCymru to 1,355; this being evidence of your kindness. 

P.S. You’ll be able to see BanglaCymru featured on ‘Dechrau Canu, Dechrau Canmol’, S4C, one Sunday evening in May.

Part 2

1. BANGLACYMRU -ANNUAL REPORT   

01.07.2018 – 30.06.2019

Once again, it’s a pleasure to send you the BanglaCymru annual report at the end of the financial year which ended on June 30th. As usual, this report is a synopsis of the updates sent online during the year.  

Our centre in Chittagong still serves the poor of the riverside part of this vast city and many take advantage of this free service to be seen by our medical co-ordinator, Dr Jishu or our lady doctor who works regularly at the centre. Our centre employs the two doctors, a male nurse from the nearby Hill Track tribe and one boy who looks after our premises. We are truly grateful to the Pontypridd Siroptomists who are continuing to sponsor our health visitor who is a key member of our project and works amongst the poor close to our centre and who arranges the monthly ‘medical camps’ (mobile surgery). These medical camps are arranged in very disadvantaged areas amongst the lowest members of society and attracts scores of patients who are amazed that they can be seen by a doctor free or charge. A monthly ‘medical camp’ update is sent to the Siroptomists regularly which is a key part of the health worker’s work.     

The recent plan to hold eye clinics at our centre every fortnight have proven a great success. On average 30 patients visit our centre and makes them aware of our other services. 

As you know, our prime mission is to give free operations to those with the cleft or palate cleft (or both) and patients who have suffered serious burns. Apart from the few operations that take place in our centre under local antithesis we have to take patients who need general anaesthesia because of the severity of their condition to local registered hospitals. However, our usual practice is to go from city to city and to hire some of the local hospital’s provisions to hold what is known locally as ‘cleft camps’. This year we visited three cities to hold these sessions.  

Over the last eleven years BanglaCymru has changed the lives of so many poor patients in this challenging country, and this year 65 operations were performed bringing the total since the establishment of the charity to 1,360. I’m truly grateful to the S4C programme, ’Dechrau Canu, Dechrau Canmol’ for featuring the charity on a recent programme which brought in many contributions.